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2017 Bangalore Test


BEML end, Chinnaswamy

BEML end, Chinnaswamy

I am tempted to say that Bangalore 2017 is the best test match of our lives. But the heroes of Calcutta 2001 won’t let me do that.

I am glad that the test match got over, though I would’ve secretly wanted it to carry on for ever. Let me rephrase it, when was the last time, we followed every ball of every session of every day of a test match, from the edge of our seats? I don’t remember. Or simply, there hasn’t been a test match, as good as this one at the Chinnaswamy, in the last 15 years. When I came out after having watched the Day 1 action from the N stand at the BEML end, I was tired and worn out, much like the players, and was cross because 8 of our batters had gifted their wickets to Nathan Lyon. I sought answers for so many questions. “How could you let a visiting spinner dominate you? How could you bring back the horrors of Panesar and Swann? We have attacked even Warne and Muralitharan in their prime and aren’t O’keefe and Lyon lesser mortals?” I thought the test was over and the Border Gavaskar trophy would simply stay in Australia. But, everyone including the Umpire’s call had other ideas.

I followed the Day 2 action on TV, Day 3 on Hotstar, Day 4, again on TV and not going to the stadium in these 3 days, will remain one of the massive regrets in my life. I should’ve been the 12th man from the stands. India’s resurgence and discipline in the first session of Day 2 took us back to Calcutta. But the turning point of the game has to be Ishant’s spell to Steve Smith and the funny faces that followed it. It was fodder for the meme makers, fans and Virat Kohli. Oh, and before this, Ashwin produced the mirror image of his ball to Amla in the T20 semifinal, to send back David Warner and made millions, like me, join the send off party.

None of the defensive strokes bored anyone. There was action in every ball, literally. Every leave drew comments from close-in fielders. Funny faces followed every time the ball beat the willow. Kohli loved the scenes. He would have paid millions, even his IPL contract, to be in this moment. The moment even got to Pujara, of all people. Yes, even to Cheteshwar Rahul Dravid Pujara. The cameras captured him involved in the chatter. Day 2 saw only 197 runs scored off the 90 overs. But that was already the best day of the Home Test season. Chinnaswamy showed the world that it loved its test matches like Lords and MCG, as the crowd swelled even on a weekday.

When the going gets tough, classical test batsmen know how to survive. They will negate the naughty bounce by shuffling. They will negotiate the flight, loop and classical off spinner’s wicket taking trajectory. They will not poke outside the off stump. They know exactly when to drive and when, not to. They play with the opposition’s patience. They prod. They defend. They leave. They grind it out. They survive. And slowly, they notch up the runs. That’s what Dravid and VVS did in Calcutta. That’s what Dravid did in Jamaica and Leeds. And that inspired two shy young men in Rajkot and Mumbai, who saw these knocks on TV. Fifteen years later, they pull off the unthinkable. They produce the partnership of the decade, which the knowledgeable fans rate, as the best since Calcutta. No wonder that Kohli rated Pujara and Rahane as the team’s best test batsmen. But it all started with KL Rahul, the prodigious dude from Bangalore, who can switch with ease, from batting like Dravid to batting like Sehwag. 90 and 51 when the bowlers were all over the batters, should inspire him to emulate the gentleman with whom he shares his name and city.

I couldn’t miss the Day 4 action. It would’ve been criminal. So, I decided to work from home. But I could barely work. I knew where my thoughts were. And just like that, the Aussie pacers orchestrated our batting collapse. It was breathtaking fast bowling. I had the best seat in the house on Day 1 in the N stand to see Starc ‘air’ swinging the red cherry. It was quite a sight. I could see how it curved, sitting 80m away. But it didn’t find the timber then. And when it did, on Day 4, it looked beautiful, like it had found its rightful hang out place. We were down from 4-down to all back in the hut.

188 to win. Plenty at stake. Kohli’s pride. Ashwin’s pride. Chinnaswamy’s pride. India’s pride. And yeah, the frigging Border Gavaskar trophy. Recent stats showed it was unconquerable. But Warner could conquer it in a session and a half. Smith could play on for ever and make runs. Renshaw could carry on despite, having to answer the nature’s call. Defending the score wasn’t going to be easy. And then it all began to happen. Renshaw fell. Warner looked to end Ashwin’s career. He tried to sweep, slog-sweep, paddle-sweep and even the reverse sweep, but couldn’t connect. And when he did, it sailed over long on. Ashwin, for the first time in the test, felt the pressure. Kohli would’ve been tempted to take him out of the attack. But he somehow, gave him another over. Warner’s eyes lit up. He could’ve sent the ball to Brigade Road or even the metro. But he loses his balance, almost falls over and importantly, fails to connect. Trapped. Leg Before Wicket. Umpire’s call seemed like a thing of beauty to billions. Two down. The bounce was uneven. Even Ishant Sharma was unplayable to Steve Smith. Everyone wanted the ball be given to Umesh Waqar Younis Yadav. Kohli acknowledged. Umesh came charging in, from his short run up. The ball skidded. It kissed the worm in the pitch, after pitching. It bounced that high. All this happened at pace, at 90 miles an hour. The shooters continued. One of them traps Shaun Marsh well outside the off stump. Trapped. Leg before wicket. Cacophony followed. A miscommunication during the DRS discussion saw him walking back. Umesh’s next shooter, rolls of the pitch and fetches him the wicket of his career. Steve Smith’s third brain fade moment in the match happens. He was not good at abbreviations, from school days. Dressing Room Review System is going to haunt him for the rest of his life. Pujara rushes in. Kohli is animated. He gives a mouthful to Smith. Umpire shows Smith the way. Kohli has a lot of things to say. Chinnaswamy is on its feet. The boos begin. Four down. It’s India’s game to lose now. I compose a couple of tweets to express my displeasure at Smith’s behaviour. Another wicket falls. And in a matter of another 15 minutes, Ashwin runs through the Aussie line up. Another game. Another fifer. Kohli starts sprinting. He gestures his celebratory pose towards Kumble and the entire Chinnaswamy. The series is squared. Michael Vaughan is elated. So, are the poms. Border Gavaskar trophy is alive. Ah, Bangalore 2017 is the best test match of our lives, along with Calcutta 2001. I am going to preserve the match ticket. It is Gold.

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Indian Cricket – stooping to an all time low!


Everyday starts with me, lying in the bed, under the quilt and holding my smartphone; conveniently tapping my ways through the timelines of Facebook, Twitter, Gmail and my new found love, Instagram. It’s a daily routine that roughly extends to half an hour in the morning.Timeline in all these social networking sites didn’t look that impressive this morning. None of the hot chicks in my friends list had changed their profile pictures. Everyone in Twitter were still jobless busy in discussing the screwing of Rahul Gandhi by Arnab Goswami. Mails regarding my freelance work too were not be seen. That was when I arrived at youtube. The best thing about it is that it exactly knows what you like and itself recommends a list of videos. As I strolled through the options, the one which caught my eye was the ongoing India’s seemingly disastrous tour of New Zealand.
Let us face it. Indian cricket is facing a crisis. The masters of the flat tracks bat like school boys when the ball zips, swings, seams and bounces in alien conditions. Be it Australia. England. South Africa. or New Zealand. The same set of boys who make a mockery of targets in excess of 350 in ODIs in India, have now been found wanting. It will be grossly unfair if I do not exclude Virat Kohli from all the bashing. The brashly Delhi batsman has already become an ODI legend. Hang on. He has already done enough, for me to compose a separate blog post on him. So, that’s about Virat for now.
Why do we call the current situation, a crisis? We’ve always been poor travelers and were bound to struggle overseas. Our stats men will agree to that. Wouldn’t they? But my generation will not. For us, Indian team always meant ‘Business’ overseas. The team we saw while growing up, consisted of a bunch of honorable cricketers. They were the fighters, which none dared to take for granted. They had this mix of experience and youth, which gelled beautifully to give us the results. They had the leader who could put his hand around his bowler’s shoulder and telling him that he is going to win us the Test match.
I am trying hard to not make the IPL as the punching bag. We resemble the team of the early 90s. Kohli scores, we win and if he doesn’t, rarely barely do we win. Though MSD’s batting in ODIs has been as consistent as anyone’s, his Midas touches as captain seem to have vanished. His team selections make the Indian Hockey selection committee look angelic. The bowlers try hard to get into the all time list of worst bowlers. Suddenly Indian fans have awakened to the reality that Ajit Agarkar and Ashish Nehra were the McGraths and Akrams during their times.
It’s easier to make scapegoats, but tougher to provide solutions. First things first, England have sacked their coach. So why not send this Duncan Fletcher back to where he belongs and bring in one of our own retired guys to coach. Second, pick players in the squad purely for cricketing reasons. There must be something beyond the cricketing reasons that Cheteshwar Pujara doesn’t figure in the ODI squad. Thirdly, my 11 year old cousin knows how Suresh Raina gets out in International cricket but it looks like our selectors and captain doesn’t.  And fourthly, dear BCCI, asking for a large chunk of ICC’s share is fine, but how are you going to use it to produce a Dale Steyn?
An Indian Cricket Fan, moves on!!